Avoiding Internet Pornography

Pornography is a multi billion dollar industry. There is a constant production of lewd movies, images & sex tools because there is so much worldwide demand for it. The advancement of internet technology allows pornographic streaming videos to be downloaded quickly from the internet onto computers & hand held devices.

Pornography is considered as Adult entertainment & deemed normal by liberal minded people. However, child pornography is illegal & scorned. All actors in a pornography production must be over the legal age of 18 years old. Also, people below 18 years of age are not allowed (albeit minimally enforced) to view pornography both online & in the real world.

Could the ease of exposure to internet pornography contribute to young children becoming sexually active? Recent statistics shows that 9 out of 10 children between the age of 8 and 16 actually visit pornographic sites over the internet. There have also been stories of children engaging in co-ed sex parties & orgies. It suggests that internet pornography is playing a part in building sexual curiosity in children at such an early age. Is it what we want for our children? Small children are human beings too and can also be naturally aroused sexually. However, children are more susceptible to misunderstand the complexities associated with performing sexual activities like pregnancy & sexually transmitted diseases (S.T.D.).

It is in reality not the problem of children actually visiting pornographic websites but instead lies in the issue of them being accidentally directed to such “adult” websites. A recent survey done by the University of Hampshire achieved similar results. “66 percent said that they did not want to view the images & had not sought them out”, said the researcher.

A pornographic website may even be only a mouse click away. Banners, links, spam emails & other forms of online marketing are being misused as tools to lure even the most innocent of internet users. There are ways to prohibit pornographic content from being displayed even in the event of an accidental mouse click.

Commercial softwares termed Parental Control Softwares like Cyber Sentinel, Cyber Snoop, ishield, Net Nanny 5, & Optenet are able to filter images & advertisements of pornographic nature. It can help in such a way to prevent our children from being led into pornographic websites.

However, parental control softwares are still unable to fully prevent online pornography from being presented to our children online. More & better measures are required to restrict the use of sophisticated methods of online pornography marketing.

Therefore, parents should play an active role in educating their children about the consequences of viewing internet pornography. We should inform our children & show them about what they can & should not do on the internet. Also, inform them to question their actions before clicking on seductive advertisements which may lead them to the illicit pornographic websites.

Why Do People Hate Pornography? A Real Reason for Change

So why do people hate pornography? For the enlightened crowd we tend to hate pornography because it enslaves men and dumbs us down. Pornography alters the way that the mind works and causes men to become controlled by their most primitive instincts. Ultimately it weakens us and makes us docile with no drive or hunger in life.

Who Runs Your Life

Adult entertainment appears to be a harmless vice but when you look closer at its impact it becomes anything but harmless. The images in porn work exactly like a drug and it can control you. As with any addiction, even casual use, your body develops a tolerance to what excites it. Soon you seek more extreme images and fetishes. This becomes extremely detrimental because it is all a fantasy – pure and simple. The fantasy starts to have marring effects on life because nothing in reality can compare to the alternate world that you delve into. Relationships, both emotional and physical, can never live up to the images stored in your head.

On top of effecting relationships with women pornography tends to keep men weak and unmotivated. Napoleon Hill in Think and Grow Rich states that control of sexual urges is the key to wealth in your life. This not only means financial wealth but abundance as a whole. Just as a lion hunts the hardest when he is hungry men strive for greatness when they are driven. When you have a sexual desire it can be trans mutated into motivation to do something great with your life. By using pornography and masturbation you squelch that fire and you become content with the computer. Don’t believe me? Try going without masturbation and porn for three weeks and see how you feel. The power that you possess is unbelievable

Failed Interactions

The next travesty in adult entertainment is that you begin to have a twisted view on how you see women. Pornography trains your brain to believe that women are for pleasure and an object to lust over. How many times have you seen a woman and the only thing you notice are chest and butt? You never seem to notice real beauty such as eyes, hair, or skin. Human interactions become about who can give you instant pleasure. This is not good as you will never be able to have real interactions with women without there being an ulterior motive.

When viewing adult content it always involves physically desirable women. While this appears to be fine the effects on social connections are terrible. After enough porn consumption you begin to associate gorgeous women with the fantasy you seen on the computer. That is why men who have problems talking to women almost always have a porn addiction. They see beautiful women as a fantasy and they are unobtainable. If you want to be good with women get away from porn and masturbation.

In Conclusion

So after reading this hopefully you can better understand why people hate pornography. There is never anything good that comes out of it except a twisted view of women and reality. Step away because the effects can be life altering.

Why Pornography Should Be Introduced and Critiqued In Sex Education Programming At All School Levels

The phrase love that dare not speak it’s name was coined by Lord Alfred Douglas. It first appeared in his poem, “Two Loves,” printed (in the Chameleon) in 1896. It’s a reference to homosexual love, in Lord Alfred’s case, of Oscar Wilde, who was subsequently charged with gross indecency. Homosexuality was a criminal offense in England and just about everywhere else in the 19th century. Today, there is another sexual outlet not so much forbidden as not addressed in polite or other society – a new form of love the name of which sex educators dare not speak: pornography.

This is most unfortunate: a new study suggests that while parents may not be aware of the fact, pornography is the leading sex educator of the young. Alas, the porn industry has no interest in serving a sex education function and certainly does not do so, at least not in a positive, constructive or healthy fashion.

Porn is pervasive, particularly where it is most highly censored. China, for example, is the world’s leading consumer of porn. Jerry Ropelato, author of “Internet Pornography Statistics” at the research website Top Ten Reviews, notes that $3,075.64 is spent on pornography every second of every day. In this one-second period, 28,258 internet users are viewing pornography and 372 internet users are typing adult search terms into search engines. Two of the top twenty search terms are teen sex and teen porn. The pornography industry has larger revenues than Microsoft, Google, Amazon, eBay, Yahoo, Apple and Netflix combined. Data from 2006 reported worldwide pornography revenues at $97.06 billion.

Australian researchers David Corlett and Maree Crabbe filmed 140 interviews with young people in what was called “The Reality and Risk Research Project.” They discovered that teens are increasingly turning to the net for sex education. (Source: Denise Ryan, “Teachers urged to address porn factor,” The Australian Age, February 13, 2012.) Porn sex education exerts a destructive influence in the lives of the young. One of the investigators said, “Every young person we interviewed told us that pornography is a significant part of youth culture and particularly of young men’s lives.” She added, “Pornography has become harder, rougher, more hardcore.”

Porn, as you might expect, does not commonly offer instruction in matters relevant to conventional sex education (e.g., the nature of contraception, the prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections, the value of intimacy, principles of effective relationships). On the contrary, what it inadvertently communicates to young men, according to “The Project” research group, is reckless, coercive and abusive treatment of women. There is an absence of realistic perspectives and a dearth of respectful treatment of sexual partners. In addition, sexual practices of an unsafe nature are commonplace. While informed adults may have the maturity to manage such depictions, teens with little or, more often, no sexual experience clearly do not.

Since parents usually cannot keep porn from being accessed one way or another or one time or other by their children, the more likely best strategy is to include porn awareness in sex ed instruction. This is the focus of efforts by “The Project” team. Several grants have provided the resources to prepare and test programs for use in training sex education teachers for varied school grade levels. While teachers need skills to address this issue, teens need exposure to effective critiques of pornography’s representations of gender and sex. Among the objectives of the Project team is to develop teaching materials that present diverse scenarios for classroom discussions that will enable young adults to distinguish between what they see depicted in porn and reality.

The overwhelming majority of parents believe their child has never seen pornography. However, a 2003 Australia Institute investigation citied in the Australian Age article cited above reported that 84 per cent of boys and 60 per cent of girls had access to sex sites on the internet. A 2006 Australian study of youths aged 13 to 16 found that 92 per cent of boys and 61 per cent of girls had been exposed to pornography online.

Of course, Republicans in this country might favor a simpler solution: Pass new laws banning pornography or otherwise make it nearly impossible for young people to gain access to it. Given the widespread availability of social media of all kinds in the wired culture of our age, a reliance on censorship does not seem promising (not to dwell on the consistency of such a Draconian tactic with that troublesome First Amendment in America). Good luck cutting off porn – shy of creating a police state. Better sex education is cheaper and quicker, more likely and better suited to personal liberties and sound education.

Everyone, including the young, needs a broad set of knowledge and critical thinking skills to reject a sexuality that eroticises degradation and violence, glorifies unrealistic body types (particularly large breasts and out-sized penises) and undermines relationship elements founded on respect, courtesy and the common decencies.

It is hard enough in the current climate of Right Wing evangelical Republican culture war wedge politics to gain acceptance for sex ed of any kind, let alone adding porn assessment to the mix. If a school board or individual educator in this country tried to address pornography, he or she would be cited by Santorum, Romney or Gingrich as an example of what’s wrong with Obamacare. Try dealing with this crisis only if willing to deal with a firestorm of controversy from the Right.

Yet, all evidence and the lessons from Prohibition and the Comstock era suggest that ignoring or trying to repress the pervasiveness of pornography as it affects youthful sexual expectations and behavior is pernicious and irresponsible.

In my view, we need to make clear as part of sex ed that porn has nothing to do with love. We dare not NOT speak its name – and dare NOT ignore the reality of pornography’s dreadful influence on the sexual miseducation of the young. If this upsets Republicans, well, that’s just too bad. If they had enjoyed better sex education, they might be more sensible about such things – and probably less interested in porn, as well.

Be weller than well, give ‘em hell and try always to look on the bright side of life.

Keep Away Pornography From Homes

With the advent of the internet, there is much unwanted adult content and pornography. These materials have grave negative implications for children, parents, spouses, and the family at large. Previously, matters of sex were relegated to the bedroom and brothels. People shied away from discussing or displaying sexual passion in public. Today, unwanted adult content is readily accessible, even through mobile phones.

Society should be apprehensive when unwanted online adult content and pornography falls into the hands of children. While it is a fact that children will, at one stage in their lives, come to comprehend sex, it is the nature and age of orientation that are perturbing. Sex is pleasurable and addictive to some extent. However, this is not what we desire for human beings in their formative years to embrace. Every person undergoes a systematic developmental process and sex has its moment, which is definitely not childhood. We need to allow children to enjoy their innocence, and to grow naturally into adulthood.

Unwanted online adult content and pornography may appear to the casual eye as being beneficial to couples, but that is far from the reality. It is factual that couples can learn several techniques on how to give one another pleasure when having sexual intercourse, after they watch this kind of content. However, adult material is likely to foment discontent in marriages or relationships since either or both of the partners may develop unrealistic sexual expectation from the other. It should always be borne in mind that the people portrayed in pornography videos are actually actors, who are trained to exaggerate the acts and effects of sex. Couples trying this at home will only be disillusioned, and may resort to infidelity in search of elusive sexual pleasure. Pornography may destroy marriage instead of building it.

Unwanted online adult content and pornography are also destroying the moral fabric of the society since they defy and negate all the societal and cultural norms that people have learnt to live with. Few people can argue with the notion that religion and society bring order and harmony in a community. Allowing online adult content into our homes is to disorient the manner in which any society operates. Unless such stuff is monitored and restricted, we risk having a society in which the young and the elderly do not respect one another, and where the inviolability of marriage and the honor of the family are disregarded.

Unwanted Online Adult Content and Pornography – We Can Take Control

Has it happened to you? Have you been online browsing, perhaps doing research, and you mistype a URL (you thought you had the correct website) and suddenly, up pops an adult site, which you have no desire to see. Perhaps it gets worse, and you get more and more and more…and you effectively lose control of your machine until you reboot. Annoying at best…and it could be worse…perhaps you had to reboot and you lost important work.

Has this happened to your child while doing homework? Nine out of ten children between the ages of 8 and 16 have been exposed to online pornography, and most of the time it happened by accident while they were doing work for school. How bad is that?

The average age of first internet exposure to pornography is 11 years old. Last year 28% of all youth Internet users reported unwanted exposure to online pornography.

In 2006, three years ago, US revenue from Internet pornography was $2.8B. That is a lot of pornography online. There are over 80,000,000 web pages with pornographic images and there are new sites appearing daily.

It is not just the accidental views that create a problem, and it is not just a problem for children.

10% of adults admit to Internet sexual addiction. 47% of families say that pornography is an issue in their homes. Two thirds of divorce lawyers say that excessive interest in online pornography played a significant role in divorces.

These are not problems that we are helpless to prevent or to protect ourselves against. We have greater choice than internet or no internet. We have the ability to take charge and to bring ourselves a G-Rated internet experience.

There are three primary mechanisms for obtaining a G-Rated internet: physical, legal and mechanical.

The physical solution is simply to ensure that computer usage takes place in a public location. Keep computers in family areas at home and not in private rooms. Use your computer where others can see, at least peripherally what you are doing. This does not prevent the accidental stumbling on of unwanted sites, but it helps to prevent the temptation to “just take a quick peak” at some questionable site. It keeps children from playing where they should not.

The legal solution is to diligently report unwanted sites and online experiences. Report them to your ISP. Report them to the local authorities. Most police organizations and certainly the FBI diligently track and prosecute those who abuse the internet by forcing unwanted adult content down our throats.

The mechanical approach is not really mechanical at all…it involves using software solutions to prevent the unwanted content, the pornography, from appearing. There are many solutions which monitor chat, text messages, email, etc. These can detect and even block inappropriate online conversations, alert parents or other adults to potentially hazardous online situations and help to prevent long term damage to reputations.

Detecting inappropriate images is more complex. There are not many solutions out there, fewer than fifteen, and mostly they don’t really work all that well. There are two fundamental problems:

1) True image analysis is very complex and requires substantial compute power, more than your PC or laptop;

2) Sites often have dynamic content so what a site that was fine one day may be inappropriate the next.

Most solutions rely on URL name white and black lists to keep “bad” sites from showing up. These can certainly help, but they cannot address the dynamic content problem, and new sites are coming along so often that the black and white lists are always out of date. Some products claim to do true image analysis based on skin tones and colors entirely on your laptop or desktop. True, accurate image analysis is complex and requires significant compute power as well as continual tuning and updating. The average laptop or desktop cannot provide compute power to execute true and accurate image analysis.

You can take control of your internet experience. Using tools like those mentioned here, or which have similar capabilities, can provide you with a G-Rated internet experience. When the tools fail, report those failures to the vendors, and report the sites to your ISP and to the authorities. Use common sense when using and placing your computer. By combining these three approaches, you can go back to have enjoyable internet experiences despite the proliferation of unwanted adult content and pornography online.

Launched in 2009 in cooperation with Milabra and based on their proprietary analytic technology, Online Chaperone believes that families have the absolute right to have a G-Rated internet experience in their homes, that they have the right to know with certainty that no one in the family need to be exposed to unwanted images, adult content or pornography and that the Internet is intended to be fun, safe and clean, and that it should encourage learning and socializing without exposing innocent eyes to unwelcome pictures. Online Chaperone offers URL, image and text analysis products.

The Online Chaperone pornographic and adult content detection, analysis and blocking product and service is currently accessible at [http://www.onlinechaperone.com/]. Online Chaperone operates in a hosted software as a service environment interacting with personal PCs and laptops through a small client interface.